Unattended (2014)

DoNotEnter_0151FXLo

Hendey Machine Company – Torrington, Connecticut

Nobody came when I rang for an escort, so I had to enter this facility unattended through this very small opening – use the letter-size paper sign for scale. Through the second window in the rear you can get a glimpse of what awaits.

Nikon D80

For a kindred photographic experience with these wonderful building shapes, check out Malin’s Blog

For more Urbex images check out my book HERE

Building 1 (2014)

Bldg_1_0063FxLo

Hendey Machine Company – Torrington, Connecticut

One of the largest of the buildings still on site, Building 1 dates back to the 1920s when the company outgrew its existing foundry. What lies behind the small door on the right is our way in as you will see in tomorrow’s post  – one thing an explorer learns early on is that regardless of the locks on the door, always try to see if it will open.

Nikon D80

For more Urbex images check out my book HERE

Emergency Area (2014)

Emergency_0091FltLo

Hendey Machine Company – Torrington, Connecticut

The driveway entry side of the main manufacturing area (Building 1) is posted as an emergency area – I’m not sure of what kind of emergency it would be to get me inside here. 

Nikon D80

For more Urbex images check out my book HERE

Hendey Machine and Tool Company (2014)

HendeyAgedfltglow

Street View of Hendey Company – Torrington, Connecticut

Hendey Machine Co. was founded in 1870 as a partnership between Henery J. Hendey and his brother, Arthur Hendey. The firm incorporated in 1874 and in 1899, Hendey bought the lathe patents  of the Shellenback Machine Tool Co. Until Hendey closed, they made metal-working machinery; most notably lathes, planers, and shapers. 

Modified Nikon D100 (Near IR capture) – image processed with wet plate filter and vignetting to give an antique look to the image.

For more Urbex images check out my book HERE

Along the Road (2014)

DownTheRoad_1731FXLo

Seaside Regional Center — Waterford, Connecticut

Time to move on to another location, but don’t worry, I have plenty of Seaside images in my picture vault for another visit. Whatever the plans are for making this location into a State park, I doubt that what remains will be able to keep the charm and wonder of the site if they choose to raze these structures.

Modified Nikon D100 (Near IR capture)

For images of my film swap with Helen Briggs Photography, click HERE

For an article on how I shoot abandoned spaces click HERE

You Cannot Afford This View (2014)

LookingOut_DCS9448seasideFXLo

Superintendent’s Cottage at Seaside Regional Center — Waterford, Connecticut

Looking out at long Island Sound from one of the many bedrooms in the cottage…a quick check of real estate pricing with water views has homes in this town starting at $2 million – but hey, it’s only money and what could go wrong with purchasing more house than you can afford?

Nikon D610 FX

For an article on how I shoot abandoned spaces click HERE