A Tepid Relationship (2016)

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Shenango China Company — New Castle, Pennsylvania

Shenango China operated as a subsidiary Syracuse China and this move shocked the employees of Shenango China, because Syracuse China was their longtime and bitter rival. Syracuse China officials publicly said they wanted to keep the Shenango China plant open, but most people in New Castle knew this promise was too good to be true. Major uncertainty reigned in New Castle.

Nikon D800

More of my work can be seen here

Shenango China/Shenango Pottery

Another Losing Battle (2016)

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Shenango China Company — New Castle, Pennsylvania

In January 1987, after resisting a hostile takeover bid for several months, Anchor Hocking officials agreed to a merger with the Newell Company of Freeport, Illinois. Newell took control of Shenango China, but later passed the assets off to Canadian Pacific (U.S.) – the parent company of Syracuse China – in late December 1987. 

Nikon D800

More of my work can be seen here

Shenango China/Shenango Pottery

Invest Yourself (2016)

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Shenango China Company — New Castle, Pennsylvania

In June 1979, Shenango China was acquired by the Anchor Hocking Corporation of Lancaster, Ohio. despite uncertainty about future of Shenango China  Anchor Hocking made a sizable investment and expanded the company in the early 1980’s. In December 1984 the Mayer China division was sold off to Syracuse China, the biggest competitor of Shenango China.

Nikon D800

More of my work can be seen here

Shenango China/Shenango Pottery

Pressure Mounts (2016)

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Shenango China Company — New Castle, Pennsylvania

In January 1968 Shenango China was sold to the International Pipe & Ceramics Corporation (INTERPACE) of Parsippany, New Jersey. INTERPACE continued to operate the company despite the declining economy of the early 1970’s. Castleton China was steadily reduced and then closed down for good in 1974. The employees, faced with layoffs and reduced hours, began to lose confidence in their management. A series of strikes between 1974 and 1977 worsened the situation. After the last strike, which began in late February 1977 and lasted seventy-seven days, INTERPACE decided to sell the company.

Nikon D800

More of my work can be seen here

Shenango China/Shenango Pottery

By Any Other Name (2016)

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Shenango China Company — New Castle, Pennsylvania

In August 1954 the executives of the Shenango Pottery Company decided to change the name of the firm to Shenango China, Inc. The New Castle News of August 23, 1954, reported, “…the reason for the change is that the firm wishes to emphasize the fact that all the ware made by Shenango is vitrified china. “Pottery” is generally used to designate earthware and other non-vitrified china products.” Vitrified, essentially meaning “turned into glass,” indicates a process involving multiple firings that makes the china much more durable.

Nikon D800

More of my work can be seen here

Shenango China/Shenango Pottery

Going Down (2016)

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Shenango China Company — New Castle, Pennsylvania

Shenango China began a slow decline during the 1950’s, primarily due to cheap foreign imports of tableware. The company still attempted mergers to solidify their industry dominance, acquiring Wallace China of Huntington Park, California, in 1959 and Mayer China of Beaver Falls in 1964. The Wallace acquisition proved to be a failure (closing in 1964), while the Mayer purchase proved to be quite profitable. However, by the  mid-1960’s, the Shenango had laid off more than 1,200 employees.

Nikon D800

More of my work can be seen here

Shenango China/Shenango Pottery

Happy Daze (2016)

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Shenango China Company — New Castle, Pennsylvania

Employing 3,300 people at the start of 1947, the now thriving company was at its peak in the immediate postwar era with the plant turning out ore than 145,000 pieces of china per day.

Nikon D800

More of my work can be seen here

Shenango China/Shenango Pottery